Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/11328/4513
Title: Children’s perspectives on using serious games as a complement to promoting their social–emotional skills
Authors: Xavier, Ana
Vagos, Paula
Palmeira, Lara
Menezes, Paulo
Patrão, Bruno
Pereira, Sónia
Rocha, Vanessa
Mendes, Sofia
Tavares, Marta
Keywords: Social–emotional learning
Serious games
Issue Date: 4-Aug-2022
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Xavier, A., Vagos, P., Palmeira, L., Menezes, P., Patrão, B., Pereira, S., Rocha, V., Mendes, S., & Tavares, M. (2022). Children’s perspectives on using serious games as a complement to promoting their social–emotional skills. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public HealthInt, 19(9613), 1-10. https://doi.org/10.3390/ ijerph19159613. Repositório Institucional UPT. http://hdl.handle.net/11328/4513
Abstract: The use of serious games may be an appealing and complementary way to motivate curriculum-based social and emotional learning (SEL); still, investigation into this potential usefulness is scarce. This study aims to address the usefulness of serious games within the program ‘Me and Us of Emotions’. Specifically, we analyzed the differences in children’s satisfaction in sessions that did or did not use serious games as a complement to the intervention, explored the contribution of using serious games to the global satisfaction with the program, and explored children’s qualitative feedback regarding the sessions. The participants were 232 children (122 boys and 110 girls) aged between 8 and 12 years old (M = 9.09, SD = 0.80). The measures were based on the subjective appraisals of the sessions made by the participating children, including quantitative and qualitative assessments of the degree of satisfaction of the participants. The results showed that there were similar levels of satisfaction with the sessions that did or did not use serious games as a complement to the program. However, only satisfaction with the sessions that used serious games (and not satisfaction with the sessions that did not use them) contributed significantly to explaining both the enjoyment of the activities and the interest in the subjects. Satisfaction with serious games was significantly and positively associated with fun, easiness, ability to understand the session, and ability to cope with emotions. Qualitative analysis showed three main themes, namely: positive aspects, negative aspects, and opportunities for improvement of the program. Overall, these results indicate that children’s satisfaction with the ‘Me and Us of Emotions’ program is related to serious games, suggesting the relevance of using this complementary tool more often when intervening with younger generations.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/11328/4513
ISSN: 1660-4601 (Electronic)
1661-7827 (Print)
Appears in Collections:INPP - Artigos em Revistas Internacionais / Papers in International Journals

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
ijerph-19-09613-v2.pdf374.13 kBAdobe PDFView/Open


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.